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  • 1965-Meyers-Manxter-2-2-Dune-Buggy-1
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Designed and built by an avid surfer and boat builder who wanted to upset the existing buggies of the time, Bruce Meyers’s Manx dune buggy has been a phenomenon ever since it was released in 1964. If the profile looks like a VW Beetle to you, you’re not that far off, because it started with a floor-pan and powertrain before being transformed into the dream buggy and desert racer you see here. This particular example of Meyers’s creative vision is a 1965 Meyers Manxter 2+2 that was restored from the ground up in San Francisco and finished with a tan leather interior and an olive green paint job borrowed from Toyota’s FJ40 Land Cruiser. If you want to own an original, this is also Meyers Manx registry authenticated as “#0461.” This 1965 Meyers Manxter 2+2 will roll across the block with no reserve on Saturday, March 10 as part of the RM Sotheby’s Amelia Island concours.

STEALTH-WORKBENCH-BOXES-IF2

[Shop]  Just like the stash boxes that lined your father’s workbench back in the day, these metal vessels are ideal for all sorts of loose necessities. The two cases—the smaller one is nestled inside the larger one—are both made of durable stamped steel and offer simple, attractive storage for EDC gear, loose nuts and bolts, or anything you’d normally toss in your kitchen junk drawer. Each set is made in Italy and comes in a stealth color exclusive to Cool Material. For all the valuable knickknacks strewn around the house or tossed haphazardly on your workbench, these boxes are ready to placate your inner organizational fiend.