Loading…
  • This-Clock-Rotates-to-Display-the-Time-in-Different-Zones-1
  • This-Clock-Rotates-to-Display-the-Time-in-Different-Zones-2
  • This-Clock-Rotates-to-Display-the-Time-in-Different-Zones-3
  • This-Clock-Rotates-to-Display-the-Time-in-Different-Zones-4
  • This-Clock-Rotates-to-Display-the-Time-in-Different-Zones-5
  • This-Clock-Rotates-to-Display-the-Time-in-Different-Zones-6
Loading…

From altimeter designs and nixie tubes, to giant numbers and mathematical displays, we’ve seen a lot of clocks built in quite a few interesting ways over the years. The tiny World Clock designed by Masafumi Ishikawa is most definitely one of those unique clocks. This small clock uses a traditional circular interior and face that is then sleeved into a dodecagon shape with each of the twelve-sides labeled for a time zone. Thanks to some clever engineering and interior ball bearings, the time adjusts for different time zones whenever you flip a new side to the top. Despite the fact that it doesn’t function as an alarm clock, or even have a seconds hand, it’s a great travel clock because of its miniature size and almost effortless ability to switch from one time zone to another. The World Clock is available in white with black accents or black with white accents and displays the following twelve time zones: London, Mexico City, Paris, New York, Cape Town, Shanghai, Moscow, Tokyo, Los Angeles, Sydney, Karachi and New Caledonia.

Retro-Video-Game-Puzzle-IF2

We’ve long been obsessed with Things Organized Neatly, the Tumblr, Instagram account, and book that displays collections of items arranged in pleasing ways. It’s the reason we’re hard at work on this puzzle. When finished, the puzzle depicts a collection of retro video games and gaming systems aligned ever so perfectly. Each is made in the USA by the New York Puzzle Company and features original photography from artist Jim Golden. At 1000 pieces, it will put you to work for some time, but when you complete it you can use some puzzle glue and frame it on your wall. Out of chaos comes order, right?