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From altimeter designs and nixie tubes, to giant numbers and mathematical displays, we’ve seen a lot of clocks built in quite a few interesting ways over the years. The tiny World Clock designed by Masafumi Ishikawa is most definitely one of those unique clocks. This small clock uses a traditional circular interior and face that is then sleeved into a dodecagon shape with each of the twelve-sides labeled for a time zone. Thanks to some clever engineering and interior ball bearings, the time adjusts for different time zones whenever you flip a new side to the top. Despite the fact that it doesn’t function as an alarm clock, or even have a seconds hand, it’s a great travel clock because of its miniature size and almost effortless ability to switch from one time zone to another. The World Clock is available in white with black accents or black with white accents and displays the following twelve time zones: London, Mexico City, Paris, New York, Cape Town, Shanghai, Moscow, Tokyo, Los Angeles, Sydney, Karachi and New Caledonia.

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The new Bolinas Offshore Boots from Seavees  is perfect for braving the elements and lends both function and fashion to your wardrobe.   These vegan, double gore pull-on rubber rainboots are made from matte-finished waterproof natural rubber and they are perfect for your daily commute in the rain and are equally at home on a hike through the woods. Seavees is donating 10% of sales from the Bolinas Boot benefit Un Mar De Colores who work to cultivate & inspire inclusivity, diversity, ocean stewardship and surf therapy for children of color & underserved youth.  Get your Bolina’s here