When people think about newsletters, their first instinct is to usually groan at the idea of some company whose email they regretfully signed up for years ago spamming them about discounts, or giving them unsolicited advice about something they don’t care about. It’s a thing. But not all newsletters are garbage and spam mail. In fact, there are quite a few out there geared toward curating awesome content that’s useful, education, inspiring, and even motivational (for those ass-dragging Monday mornings—you know what we’re talking about).

ELEVATOR

ELEVATOR is a newsletter for guys. Period. Mind you, there’s no breaking news or egregious political Tweets. That’s not the goal. The goal is to provide men with a collection of carefully curated high-level content that’ll make readers think and give us all something to talk about during our daily grind. You’ll find interesting articles from around the web, grooming and style tips, beautiful travel locations, and even a hot girl or two thrown in for good measure—all in one place. Their tag line is: “In the time it takes to ride an elevator, we’ll make a guy’s life richer.” We don’t doubt it. Link


Now I Know

Ever heard that saying, “You learn something new every day?” Of course you have. But, signing up for Now I Know will absolutely guarantee that. Dan Lewis, a self-proclaimed “recovering lawyer” and Sesame Street staff writer (Yes, seriously), is the brain behind Now I Know, whose mission is to provide the world with something—one thing—every day, that they didn’t know. The best part about it is Lewis writes from a very curious perspective, which lends a certain excitement to the topics Now I Know covers. You’ll learn interesting stories about things like how carrots used to be purple, why Abraham Lincoln decided to create the Secret Service (On the day he was shot, no less), and how turkey (the bird) got its name. It’s just a super interesting daily bit of reading for your inbox—which is exactly what we look for in a good newsletter. Link


Kevin Rose Newsletter

What happens when a celebrated internet entrepreneur (Diff, Pownce, Revision3, etc.) and finance guru decides to try his hand at finding cool stuff on the internet? Kevin Rose is that guy, and his newsletter is that newsletter. Rose spends the entire month compiling all the most interesting things he finds on the internet—podcasts, articles, products, culture, lifestyle, etc.—and puts them into one incredibly curated, perfectly categorized email, and delivers it straight to your inbox. Rose has an exceptional eye for the interesting goings on in our world, and his newsletter is the perfect amalgamation of the best the Internet has to offer. Link


Next Draft

So, what if news is your thing? San Franciscan writer, tech guy, and angel investor Dave Pell has his ear zero’d in on the tech game, but more interestingly than that, he views things from a societal perspective. You want to know where he thinks we’re headed as a civilization? This is the newsletter for you. Pell has an excellent nose for news and stories that no one else is paying attention to. Link


Further

Further is a newsletter dedicated to helping people live better, more fulfilling lives. It’s geared primarily toward Generation X types, but its messages about health, wealth, and personal growth are both timeless and ageless. Brian Clark is a thoughtful, inquisitive human being who only talks about things he believes will help the people who read it. If newsletters were a bodily function, Further is your deep exhale outward. Link


Mister Spoils

The problem with the Internet is that there really is just too much of it, sometimes. There are so many cool and beautiful and interesting things happening all at once, all over the world, that it can get overwhelming. Mister Spoils is a newsletter dedicated to giving readers the best of the best from across the web. We’re talking everything from the coolest Instagram accounts to follow, to the newest street fashion looks, to interesting articles, non-spammy product suggestions, and more. It pairs great with a morning coffee. Link


Sunday Dispatches

Newsletters can be redundant. They can be annoying. They can be completely fucking useless. Paul Jarvis knows that, which is why he takes the “shut up and do your best damn work” approach to Sunday Dispatches. You need that Monday motivation to go kick this week’s ass? You want to read practical advice about life and work from a guy who lives and works ‘round the clock? Paul Jarvis is your man. We wouldn’t categorize Sunday Dispatches as “tough love” or anything like that; but if you need a weekly reminder of why you do what you do and how to go out there and take your life and career by the short and curlies, this is an excellent resource. Link


Redef

Jason Hirschhorn has an unbelievable track record in the tech and pop culture sectors. He began his life as the co-president and former CEO of MySpace, he sold his website design firm to MTV Networks and came on board as their CDO. He then transitioned to an executive title over at Sling Media’s Entertainment Group, where he was responsible for introducing the world to Slingbox. His highly acclaimed newsletter, Redef, is a bastion of information for the fashion, music, sports, tech, and media. You can sign up for several different newsletters in those spaces, but we’ll be honest—they’re all incredibly insightful. He’ll talk about everything from the failings of capitalism, to how the Facebook scandals are hurting peoples’ brands, to what the hell “micro-influencing” is. It’s an absolutely fascinating look at the world around us from one of the men who helped build it. Link

xeric-cm-if2-7-22

Xeric watches have always been bold, unique and stylish, but their newest watch is absolutely otherworldly. Xeric teamed up with NASA to create watches for the 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11. The dial features a star map of the constellations surrounding Trappist-1. The grill references the ISS cupola window to give you the sense of looking out into space. The dome crystal is Hesalite, a material originally developed by NASA in the ’60s. Time is displayed with planetary hour and minute hands and stars on the sweeping seconds hand. It’s like wearing space on your wrist.