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What you see here is a work of art you can only view in person if you dive off the coast of Virgin Gorda of the British Virgin Islands. BVI Art Reef, a project spearheaded by Richard Branson and a slew of artists and philanthropists, found a decaying World War II ship, one that is suspected to be one of five that survived Pearl Harbor, and outfitted it with a sculpture of a humongous octopus. They then took the structure and deposited it deep off the coast of the aforementioned island. Why would they do that? So it can become an ever-evolving piece of art, one that helps coral and other life thrive in the area. It’s no secret that overfished areas spell trouble for the future of certain aquatic locales, and the team saw an opportunity to do something while also giving divers a “fantasy adventure.” 

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Ah, the waffle weave. Looks cool, feels great, reminds us of toasted Eggos. You’ve seen them before–probably in a fancy store or hotel–but Parachute’s brand new Waffle Towels are different. They’re spun using innovative Aerocotton Technology, which basically means they’ll be dry by the time your significant other finally gets out of the shower and realizes you stole their towel. Parachute’s Waffle Towels come in two sizes and two neutral colors. Plus, their 100% cotton construction means they start soft and only get softer with time. Even Kevin McCallister would approve.