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When British patent no. 4136 was issued to Sir David Brewster in July of 1817, little did he know how popular his Kaleidescope would become. There were many imitators, but his design was the original and intended to expand what was known as the ornamental arts by providing near-limitless patterns from a concave lens, reflecting glass panes, a rotating tube, and moving colored glass pieces. The rest is history. The sheer variety of Kaleidescopes out there is dizzying but few are as well crafted as the 19.01. Emerging from a family of machinists who craft heirlooms, the 19.01 is made of solid brass that’s been hand-machined and measures almost 3 inches in length. Grooves have been engraved into the body and the free-rotating gem end for fluid operation and style. This is a “toy” that should never be relegated to the dusty underbelly of the family room sofa. Only 50 will be made, so hop on now.

arcadia-cm-if2-9-19

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