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The Scrambler Sixty2, named after the year the first Ducati Scrambler was launched, is designed to be an accessible bike that doesn’t sacrifice style or performance and keeps maintenance to a minimum. Being relatively new to riding myself, this made it extremely easy to feel comfortable on the bike during my day with it in California. 

We started by the Santa Monica Pier and took a quick ride up the Pacific Coast Highway to Point Dume. I was surprised by how solid the bike felt going up the coast. My assumption was that a smaller bike would give a lot more, but the Sixty2 was designed to feel like a Ducati should. Its wheelbase and steel swingarm kept the ride feeling sturdy.

We proceeded along Latigo Canyon Road in Malibu, a world famous spot for tight corners and breathtaking vistas. The bike felt comfortable and responsive along the curves and, even as a novice rider, it was easy to handle.

We spent the ride back to Santa Monica and Venice capturing photos of cultural hot spots throughout the town. Here’s where I felt the most at home; being used to riding on long sweeping curves and gridded city streets. The Sixty2 was fast to respond on the throttle in low gears and easily maneuverable through California’s traffic.  

Ducati set out to make a bike that will bring new riders into motorcycling. They’re aware of the lack of a starter bike that doesn’t look like a starter bike and with the Scrambler Sixty2 they’re coming in hot. A smaller CC bike that still has all the technical craftsmanship of a Ducati is something special. Check out the gallery to see it in action.

STEALTH-WORKBENCH-BOXES-IF2

[Shop]  Just like the stash boxes that lined your father’s workbench back in the day, these metal vessels are ideal for all sorts of loose necessities. The two cases—the smaller one is nestled inside the larger one—are both made of durable stamped steel and offer simple, attractive storage for EDC gear, loose nuts and bolts, or anything you’d normally toss in your kitchen junk drawer. Each set is made in Italy and comes in a stealth color exclusive to Cool Material. For all the valuable knickknacks strewn around the house or tossed haphazardly on your workbench, these boxes are ready to placate your inner organizational fiend.